Frequently Asked Questions

Power Outage

Open the refrigerator door as little as possible so cold air stays inside until the power is restored. Remember, meats spoil quickly at room temperatures above 40 degrees. Other foods that spoil quickly are custards, creamed foods, and foods containing mayonnaise.

Food will stay frozen for about 2 days in a full freeze. Food may be refrozen if it still contains some ice crystals. If in doubt, throw it out. Adding dry ice to a freezer will help keep food frozen.

Turn on your porch light and a light inside your home. This will alert you and our repair crews when service has been restored. Turn off and unplug other electrical equipment—including computers, television sets, stereos, and microwave ovens—to protect it in case there is a change in voltage as the power returns.

Underground power lines cost up to 3 times as much to install as overhead lines, making this process too expensive for customers in rural areas (where outages most commonly occur). Underground lines also have unique maintenance problems, so installing them doesn't make the customers immune to outages.

Generally, no. We start with the biggest problems and work our way down. Depending on the extent of the outage, police stations, fire departments, and medical facilities take precedent. We also make special efforts to customers on life support.

Sometimes a blown fuse in a transformer or damage to the line servicing your home can cause an isolated outage. Our crew may also have to isolate a small section of the line to work on a problem, even while power has been restored to other parts of the same line.

Unless the cause and extent of an outage are obvious, it takes some time to determine the extent of the damage and outage. The problems are also compounded during winter storms when access can be limited. While we can provide an estimate, these factors make it hard to give an exact timeframe.

When you're calling to report an outage, hundreds of other people may be trying to do the same. Please be patient, we will answer your call as soon as possible.

If your power goes out, please call Orrville Utilities as soon as possible at (330) 684-5045. We respond to outages 24 hours a day, 365 days a year.

Water

The utility's responsibility ends at the curbside tap. However, our water services team can help you identify problems on your side of the tap if you need help.

Yes. State law requires that we chlorinate our water supply.

Yes, to a level not to exceed 1.18 parts per million.

Yes, regularly. Water quality testing is done in compliance with state and federal regulations. We test for pesticides, heavy metals, bacteria, volatile organic compounds, etc. Testing is conducted at various locations within our water treatment system and by taking samples at randomly selected customer locations. Our water quality meets or exceeds all state and federal regulations.

Your water meter reads like a car odometer. The last digit to the right records single cubic feet (one cubic foot represents 7.48 gallons.) This meter is read from left to right.